President Joe Biden is trying to speed up the process of getting Harriet Tubman's likeness put on the front of the $20 bill.

It's an action that actually began in 2016, but has been delayed. Biden hopes to set the wheels in motion for Tubman to replace Thomas Jefferson on the $20 bill. It's not a change that would happen overnight, as it would probably take several years.

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Harriet Tubman spent her first 27 years as a slave. After escaping to freedom herself, she devoted her life to her helping other slaves escape to freedom, and Cape May played a part in her being able to do just that.

Cape May celebrated Tubman's life in 2020 by opening the Harriet Tubman museum in her honor. Because of the pandemic, the museum held a virtual opening last summer:

The museum is not currently open to the public, due to the pandemic, but you can learn more at the museum's website. Her life story is certainly worthwhile to study.

Tubman's history in Cape May isn't completely clear, but it is known that she, at times, worked as a cook in the city. She used that money to finance some of her rescue trips. Some of those trips may have begun or ended in Cape May.

There is a fascinating movie about Tubman's life  that was released back in 2019. Here's a look at the trailer:

Time will tell whether Tubman finally makes in onto the $20 bill. In the meantime, hopefully soon, we'll be able to visit the Harriet Tubman Museum in beautiful Cape May.

SOURCES: New York Times, capemaymag.com

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