On July 20, 1969, the Apollo 11 spacecraft took the first humans to the Moon. As Neil Armstrong left his indelible footsteps in history, he uttered the famous words, “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” By doing so, he created a marker in time that all people could look to for reference.

Armstrong modestly admitted in a 2005 interview with 60 Minutes that he knew his steps would “be a big something for all those folks (at NASA) and indeed a lot of others who weren’t even involved in the project.” To say his estimations were accurate would be an understatement.

Anyone who was alive in 1969 has been asked where they were at the time of the Moon landing. The moment’s historical significance was felt all over the world. It’s been estimated that more than half a billion people watched on television, the occasion spurring many to ponder the possibilities of adventure far beyond planet Earth.

Much like the rest of society, many of rock’s greatest stars were gazing to the sky. Some had already established themselves as revolutionary musical acts, many were just beginning their ascent to stardom, while others had not even begun to delve into the world of music.

To commemorate this celebrated day, UCR secured direct accounts, examined old interviews and poured through historical archives to create a snapshot showing where some of rock’s greatest acts were when man landed on the Moon.